A Word from the Women at Blue on International Women’s Day

It is International Women’s Day and as a ski destination, we love that every year we see more and more people who identify as female on hill and working at ski destinations like Blue. We caught up with a few of the amazing women who work with us at Blue Mountain Resort and asked them to share what it means to them to be a woman working in the ski industry.  

Holly Steine, Human Resource Coordinator: 

What does it mean to you to be a woman working in the ski industry?

I am proud to be a woman working in the ski / outdoor industry. I feel that women are well represented in the workforce and leadership here at Blue Mountain will continue to work towards gender equality. 

What has Skiing/Snowboarding taught you? 

For someone who doesn’t love the cold, skiing has offered me a way to embrace winter. The sport brings my family together and the memories we have created on the hill will last forever. 

What advice would you tell your 6-year-old self? 

I would tell my 6-year-old self to continue to question and challenge the gender norms presented to you. You will experience barriers based on your sex, however, it doesn’t mean you have to accept those barriers. Women can do anything. In the words of Beyonce, “who run the world? GIRLS!” 

Erika Langman, Manager, Event Sales, and Services: 

What does it mean to you to be a woman working in the ski industry? 

There are pros and cons to being a woman in this industry. I’ve had my fair share of comments like ‘ Do you know how to use that drill you are carrying little lady?’ or ‘ That’s the girl’s jump take-off over there, you sure you want to hit this big one??’  It often feels like you have to prove yourself as a woman, especially in an operational role in the ski industry. But there is nothing more rewarding than a team that respects your lead as a woman who can do any job.  

What has Skiing/Snowboarding taught you? 

It has taught me the beauty of work-life balance. We are so extremely lucky to work in a place where we can take an hour in the morning to do some pow turns or hike up a mountain on our lunch break. Snowboarding has also taught me resilience. When you fall, no matter what you get back up and try that trick again until you land it. because when you land it’s one of the most incredible feelings in the world

What advice would you tell your 6-year-old self? 

If you are going to commit to something, commit! See it through to the very last step of the way. (Although my mom had this one covered for my 6-year-old self, thank you mom!) 

Tara Lovell, Manager, Public Relations: 

What does it mean to you to be a woman working in the Ski/Outdoor Industry? 

I think women have always been a part of this industry but our opportunities and roles have grown. It hasn’t always been this way and I even remember feeling like an imposter at the start of my career in skiing. I’m really optimistic about where we’re headed though. Now, everywhere you look at a Resort like Blue, you’ll see an awesome woman getting the job done

What has Skiing/Snowboarding taught you? 

As a kid, I never imagined myself as someone who would do anything on a ski hill let alone work at Ontario’s largest resort, but I was fortunate to learn to ski as an adult. Now, I couldn’t imagine my life without winters on-hill.  Skiing and riding has given me a reason to truly love winter. My experience with alpine sport has also taught me that it doesn’t matter who you are or where you come from, women can take on challenges and figure things out!   

What advice would you tell your 6-year-old self? 

My answer to this is what I tell my own daughter now: Take the time to figure out what YOU love and prioritize that unapologetically. Everything else in life will come together and be easier to navigate if you make sure to know and love yourself first.

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